Teenage Engineering Choir is an eight-piece set of MIDI-compatible wooden singing dolls

The dolls can be used isolated for a solo performance or put together to create an A Capella choir.

Teenage Engineering MIDI-Compatible Wooden Choir

Image: Teenage Engineering

Teenage Engineering has unveiled its latest development: A range of wooden dolls, each with a unique voice, designed to perform both preset classic tunes and your original compositions via MIDI.

Taking inspiration from cultural characters from around the world, Teenage Engineering today (11 November) revealed its latest development on Instagram.

Sold individually, each of the dolls included in the collection comes equipped with its own unique voice – allowing for dynamic solos when played individually, as well as a range of unique tones when combined.

Inspired by the brand’s very first project, the original Absolut Choir, the dolls come pre-programmed with repertoire of classics, including everything from the Traditional American Folk track, I’ve Been Working On The Railroad to the Ludwig Van Beethoven classic An Die Freude.

Teenage Engineering Choir
Image: Teenage Engineering

More importantly, however, alongside the instilled range of classic tunes, the choir is MIDI-capable; you can connect keyboards and other instruments to them with Bluetooth. According to the brand, connecting to one doll instantly pairs the rest of the choir.

In addition, there are some nifty design choices that contribute to the choir’s unique look and feel. The omission of physical buttons give each model a sleek appearance; the volumes of the choir can be adjusted by tilting the dolls one way or the other, and individual members can be powered up or down by simply tapping them on the top of the head.

Each member of the Teenage Engineering Choir is available for $249 each, making a complete collection worth $1,992. Find out more about the Choir and hear samples of each doll’s sound on Teenage Engineering’s website.

In other Teenage Engineering news, back in September, the brand collaborated with Yuri Suzuki to launch its very own compact record cutter. Named the PO-80 record factory, it lets creators cut their own vinyl records by recording up to four minutes of sound at 33rpm.

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